Showing posts with label Secret language of pilots and flight attendants. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Secret language of pilots and flight attendants. Show all posts

Secret language of pilots and flight attendants




Secret language of pilots and flight attendants


Pilots and flight attendants in the UK use a coded language to indicate various objects or actions on the plane. Although normal words, they have no meaning when you hear them used by the crew of the plane.

The Things You Should Never Say To A Flight Attendant ...
Our flight attendant says he's been asked to stow bags stuffed with everything from dishes, rocks and even baked goods. Most airline stewards are not cross fit athletes with superhero strength, so if you're able bodied you ...

British crews used code words to refer to actions, parts of aircraft or crew when talking inside the airplane.For laymen, they have no meaning, although normal words, writes Daily Mail.

"Whizzer" is the term used for auxiliary power unit, a small single engine in the tail which supplies electrical systems and air conditioning systems when the main engines are off. Name comes from the sound that makes.

"Weights" does not refer to some people fat, but to reserve pilots on long flights today, which replace the principal.

"Two in one" (There-and-back) refers to a race that leaves and comes back the same day. Pilots and flight attendants prefer these flights, because I do not lose a night in the hotel at the destination, then fly home until the next day.

"Director" means the air traffic controller that determines the order and place of landing in crowded airports.

What it's REALLY like to be a flight attendant - Business ...
"I am told it's harder to get invited to the Delta Flight Attendant training center than to get into Harvard University."

"Box sins" (sin bin) is the area near the runway where an aircraft may be sent to wait to make room for other planes. The planes were sent there to wait the usual restrictions flight path caused by overcrowding or bad weather at the destination.

"Self" refers to busy flight routes between Europe and North America. These routes are changed every day, depending on wind, days, seasons and airflow power.

"All-Call" refers to arming-disarming procedure which ensures that emergency exits and mattresses downhill runs.

Level one refers to the altitude at which it flies and is measured in thousands of feet. The flight level 330 means an altitude of 33,000 feet or approximately 10,000 meters.

FC time refers to the time the crew is released from a case of waiting - waiting on the ground for example.EFC means "Expected Further clearance".

"Voldemort" (deadhead) refers to a pilot or a flight attendant who must relocate to take a flight, a kind of commuting to work. For example, someone who must come to New York to work there on a flight to Los Angeles.

Ramp refers to the range of movement of the aircraft closest to the terminal.

Why you can't judge a flight attendant by her BMI
Unless, of course, you're a flight attendant. Particularly a flight attendant in India, where about 130 Air India flight attendants have been grounded or forced to retire because they were deemed unfit to fly.

Confessions of flight attendants

Always forced to smile and be friendly with all travelers, flight attendants recognize that often lose their tempers during a race and think of all sorts of oddities during a flight. Using Whisper application, ensuring their anonymity, several flight attendant told them the ideas that went through his head in those moments.

Pilots, flight attendants reveal favorite, least favorite airports
"Kathmandu is the worst airport in the world by far. A glorified bus station running at 600% capacity with no amenities and confusing security. Has some nice couches now though." — buildabeast. "Kathmandu is the worst airport in the world by far. A ...

The stewardess admitted that sometimes he would like the plane crash, that it may save someone and thus be considered a hero, writes Daily Mail. Another flight attendant said that if a passenger angry, then spits the drink that will serve him. And another said he smoked once in airplane toilet, which caused the emergency landing, but no one knew what triggered the alarm. Another hostess confesses that during an emergency landing, think only about programming that was at the hairdresser and ask if he will manage to arrive on time. Another airline employee and partner cheated with a pilot that introduced him as gay.

10 Shocking Secrets of Flight Attendants | Mental Floss
Jun 28, 2012 ... Newly hired flight attendants are placed on strict probation for their first six months. I know one new hire who lost her job for wearing her uniform ...

Because of difficult passengersflight attendants often take painkillers or get drunk with grief, immediately they finish a race, we find out in written confessions by Whisper. Sometimes, the crew on board fun night strolling aisle passenger planes and laughing faces of sleeping in strange positions and fun. Another stewardess customary to write his phone number on napkins, then they offer passengers attractive in the hope that it will then meet with them.

Attendants and flight attendants have a language "secret", ie a series of phrases they use to describe situations that arise in their field.

A busy schedule, last minute flights received, incidents with passengers - many of these situations stewardesses have a secret language so as to remain discrete even when deplore incidents, writes Business Insider . One of them decided to "break the silence" and share some of these expressions, and their significance.


Russian Economist Gets the Most Beautiful Stewardess Title ...
Dec 19, 2015 ... Secret language of stewardesses. Attendants and flight attendants have a language “secret”, ie a series of phrases they use to describe ...

"Senior mother"

"Mom Seniors" is an expression used to describe  hostesses "veteran".

"Pink-eye" - Pink Eye

If "red-eye" (freely translated red eyes) is an expression used to describe a very long flight, a night, a "pink-eye" flight is a bit shorter, but equally exhausting.

"Victory Lap" - Tour victory

After three or four days that have walked through many cities, flight attendants will catch a road to their base airport, but sometimes they have to then take a flight to a neighboring village. It is known in the industry as "victory lap".

"Lips and tips" - Lips and Nails

This expression refers to flight attendants dress exactly matching lipstick nails, outfit is an issue that must take into account any aspiring whatever program loaded and tiring implied profession.

"Flip-flop"

A "flip-flop" may explain why sometimes you part of a flight attendant less smiley. The term refers to a program less happy, more precisely, when a flight attendant flight has a "red-eye" overnight next day sleeping, and in the morning of the third day a new flight 5 or 6am. "It's like a force to be bird owl sitting overnight," said the stewardess.

"Turn" - The Return

Return describe those moments when flight attendants come to an exotic destination, but not able to see the city because the next flight back home.

"Hot room" - warm room

Hot room is a space at the airport where the flight attendants are "backup". They must be ready at any time and intervene when the schedule is messed up due to delays.

"Deplored"

"Deplored" is a word invented that is used with the same meaning as the verb "to land" and refers to when the team on board should leave the aircraft.

"UM"

UM is used to minors traveling alone ("Unaccompanied minors").

"Tagging"

Hostesses use this-word to describe a situation where they have to take an unplanned flight to a new destination. Many times you might not be prepared for this situation, ie not have proper clothes.









Secret language of pilots and flight attendants


Pilots and flight attendants in the UK use a coded language to indicate various objects or actions on the plane. Although normal words, they have no meaning when you hear them used by the crew of the plane.

The Things You Should Never Say To A Flight Attendant ...
Our flight attendant says he's been asked to stow bags stuffed with everything from dishes, rocks and even baked goods. Most airline stewards are not cross fit athletes with superhero strength, so if you're able bodied you ...

British crews used code words to refer to actions, parts of aircraft or crew when talking inside the airplane.For laymen, they have no meaning, although normal words, writes Daily Mail.

"Whizzer" is the term used for auxiliary power unit, a small single engine in the tail which supplies electrical systems and air conditioning systems when the main engines are off. Name comes from the sound that makes.

"Weights" does not refer to some people fat, but to reserve pilots on long flights today, which replace the principal.

"Two in one" (There-and-back) refers to a race that leaves and comes back the same day. Pilots and flight attendants prefer these flights, because I do not lose a night in the hotel at the destination, then fly home until the next day.

"Director" means the air traffic controller that determines the order and place of landing in crowded airports.

What it's REALLY like to be a flight attendant - Business ...
"I am told it's harder to get invited to the Delta Flight Attendant training center than to get into Harvard University."

"Box sins" (sin bin) is the area near the runway where an aircraft may be sent to wait to make room for other planes. The planes were sent there to wait the usual restrictions flight path caused by overcrowding or bad weather at the destination.

"Self" refers to busy flight routes between Europe and North America. These routes are changed every day, depending on wind, days, seasons and airflow power.

"All-Call" refers to arming-disarming procedure which ensures that emergency exits and mattresses downhill runs.

Level one refers to the altitude at which it flies and is measured in thousands of feet. The flight level 330 means an altitude of 33,000 feet or approximately 10,000 meters.

FC time refers to the time the crew is released from a case of waiting - waiting on the ground for example.EFC means "Expected Further clearance".

"Voldemort" (deadhead) refers to a pilot or a flight attendant who must relocate to take a flight, a kind of commuting to work. For example, someone who must come to New York to work there on a flight to Los Angeles.

Ramp refers to the range of movement of the aircraft closest to the terminal.

Why you can't judge a flight attendant by her BMI
Unless, of course, you're a flight attendant. Particularly a flight attendant in India, where about 130 Air India flight attendants have been grounded or forced to retire because they were deemed unfit to fly.

Confessions of flight attendants

Always forced to smile and be friendly with all travelers, flight attendants recognize that often lose their tempers during a race and think of all sorts of oddities during a flight. Using Whisper application, ensuring their anonymity, several flight attendant told them the ideas that went through his head in those moments.

Pilots, flight attendants reveal favorite, least favorite airports
"Kathmandu is the worst airport in the world by far. A glorified bus station running at 600% capacity with no amenities and confusing security. Has some nice couches now though." — buildabeast. "Kathmandu is the worst airport in the world by far. A ...

The stewardess admitted that sometimes he would like the plane crash, that it may save someone and thus be considered a hero, writes Daily Mail. Another flight attendant said that if a passenger angry, then spits the drink that will serve him. And another said he smoked once in airplane toilet, which caused the emergency landing, but no one knew what triggered the alarm. Another hostess confesses that during an emergency landing, think only about programming that was at the hairdresser and ask if he will manage to arrive on time. Another airline employee and partner cheated with a pilot that introduced him as gay.

10 Shocking Secrets of Flight Attendants | Mental Floss
Jun 28, 2012 ... Newly hired flight attendants are placed on strict probation for their first six months. I know one new hire who lost her job for wearing her uniform ...

Because of difficult passengersflight attendants often take painkillers or get drunk with grief, immediately they finish a race, we find out in written confessions by Whisper. Sometimes, the crew on board fun night strolling aisle passenger planes and laughing faces of sleeping in strange positions and fun. Another stewardess customary to write his phone number on napkins, then they offer passengers attractive in the hope that it will then meet with them.

Attendants and flight attendants have a language "secret", ie a series of phrases they use to describe situations that arise in their field.

A busy schedule, last minute flights received, incidents with passengers - many of these situations stewardesses have a secret language so as to remain discrete even when deplore incidents, writes Business Insider . One of them decided to "break the silence" and share some of these expressions, and their significance.


Russian Economist Gets the Most Beautiful Stewardess Title ...
Dec 19, 2015 ... Secret language of stewardesses. Attendants and flight attendants have a language “secret”, ie a series of phrases they use to describe ...

"Senior mother"

"Mom Seniors" is an expression used to describe  hostesses "veteran".

"Pink-eye" - Pink Eye

If "red-eye" (freely translated red eyes) is an expression used to describe a very long flight, a night, a "pink-eye" flight is a bit shorter, but equally exhausting.

"Victory Lap" - Tour victory

After three or four days that have walked through many cities, flight attendants will catch a road to their base airport, but sometimes they have to then take a flight to a neighboring village. It is known in the industry as "victory lap".

"Lips and tips" - Lips and Nails

This expression refers to flight attendants dress exactly matching lipstick nails, outfit is an issue that must take into account any aspiring whatever program loaded and tiring implied profession.

"Flip-flop"

A "flip-flop" may explain why sometimes you part of a flight attendant less smiley. The term refers to a program less happy, more precisely, when a flight attendant flight has a "red-eye" overnight next day sleeping, and in the morning of the third day a new flight 5 or 6am. "It's like a force to be bird owl sitting overnight," said the stewardess.

"Turn" - The Return

Return describe those moments when flight attendants come to an exotic destination, but not able to see the city because the next flight back home.

"Hot room" - warm room

Hot room is a space at the airport where the flight attendants are "backup". They must be ready at any time and intervene when the schedule is messed up due to delays.

"Deplored"

"Deplored" is a word invented that is used with the same meaning as the verb "to land" and refers to when the team on board should leave the aircraft.

"UM"

UM is used to minors traveling alone ("Unaccompanied minors").

"Tagging"

Hostesses use this-word to describe a situation where they have to take an unplanned flight to a new destination. Many times you might not be prepared for this situation, ie not have proper clothes.






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